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Common Name Latin Name Comments Picture
Dryopteris affinis morphotype cambrensis This fern has done well. It is an attractive fern with a nice texture and color. It now has it's own space and now looks even better. It has remained a single crown after 7 years. D. affinis is native to Europe and Asia.
Dryopteris remota A nice fern that gets 1-2 foot high where I have it. It is a shaggy, strong-looking fern that grows from a crown. It has not divided for me yet. This is another fern that I have given some more room in '99. It is a cross between D. affinis and D. expansa and not native to the US.
Dryopteris affinis `Polydactyla Dadds' This fern is making a recovery, but is still not at its full potential. The crown needed replanted, but I did not notice and it nearly completely froze a few years back. Given another year or two, I think it will be fully recovered and quite large. It has improved gradually every year but still has not flourished. Dryopteris affinis is native to Europe and Asia.
Athyrium filix-femina plumosum ?? = wider pinules Mine is not as finely cut as some of the pictures I have seen. It is a crested variety and has done well. Like most of the other Lady fern varieties, I have to watch out for slugs. The fronds of this fern have a tendency to lay down on the ground after a while. While this is the name given this fern when I purchased it from a mail order place in Cincinatti OH, it does not look like the typical Plumosum varieties. Of the pictures I have seen, it looks most like Percristatum. Lady fern varieties originate from Europe. All of my lady fern varieties have appreciated the move to their new home last year and look great in 2001.
Athyrium filix-femina `Fieldae' This has been the smallest, and slowest of my lady ferns. I have only two plants in over ten years. It is, however a nice looking fern. It seems to like to get some attention in the form of replanting every few years. It is very distinctive in that the pinnae are not at a 90 degree angle, but 45 degrees in both directions. They pinnae overlap to form a unique X pattern off the stalk. Lady fern varieties originate from Europe. All of my lady fern varieties have appreciated the move to their new home last year and look great in 2001.
Athyrium filix-femina `Corymbiferum' A nice lady fern variety. The original plant divided into a half-dozen plus new crowns which I divided successfully. Slugs do seem to like this variety, and there have been a couple of years they have pretty badly disfigured it. It appreciates being replanted every few years. This is a heavily crested fern. Lady fern varieties originate from Europe. All of my lady fern varieties have appreciated the move to their new home last year and look great in 2001.
Dryopteris filix-mas `Barnesii' This is probably my favorite male fern. I have two plants that I have more or less just left alone. They both have formed clumps 3' or so in diameter. The crowns on these do tend to grow up out of the ground, like many male ferns, but they still do not seem bothered by the cold. The fronds are tall, narrow, very upright, and a beautiful dark green. As noted elsewhere, I think I have a number of new plants that came up from spore on their own amongst some Lilly of the Valley. This picture is actually of one of the volunteers and does not really show the true nature of this fern. Dryopteris f. m. varieties are British in origin. As of 2004 I still have a number of these ferns growing but they are not as vigorous as they were before I had to move them in 2000. The sporlings are still surviving but have been slow to develop. I should not that I did place the sporllings in an area that is far from my best growing area. I'm not sure what is keeping the original clumps from thriving as before.
Cyrtomium fortunei var. intermedium I like this holly fern a lot. This may be due to the fact that it looks so much different than any native local ferns. It does get cold damage if not protected, but always seems to recover nicely. I grabbed a patch of "green stuff" under one of the plants a few years back, and put it under glass. I now have a number of these about my garden. Some winter damage may be due to poor drainage in my case. It is native to Japan, Korea, and China.
Dryopteris filix-mas `Cristata' No Comments Yet
Dryopteris filix-mas `Multicristata' No Comments Yet
Dryopteris filix-mas `Spore Variation' No Comments Yet
Dryopteris affinis morphotype affinis This fern has divided, but has also struggled with cold damage. As of '99 it finally seems to have more or less completely recovered. Dryopteris affinis is native to Europe and Asia.
Dryopteris affinis 'Angustata cristata' No Comments Yet
Athyrium filix-femina 'Minutissimum' This fern has quickly formed a large mound about 1 foot in diameter. Mine gets to be nearly a foot high, but I have it in ideal light and soil conditions. It is quite a sight in the spring to see this fern emerging. Literally hundreds of tightly coiled fronds appear within a very small area. It's amazing they get things all sorted out and don't end up a tangled mess. Lady fern varieties originate from Europe.
Dryopteris filix-mas 'Sub-linearis polydactyla' This has been another nice male fern. It has remained a single plant for the 3 years I have had it. It does not have the "ragged" look of the full linearis polydactyla. Dryopteris f. m. varieties are British in origin.
Dryopteris hondoensis This is a new addition for the fall of '99. This fern is native to Japan. It survived it's first winter just fine. It has a lot of similarities to Autumn fern. This picture is from 2001. It is doing very well as of 2003.
Dryopteris lacera This is a new addition for the fall of '99. This photo is from '01. This one does not look much like pictures I have of this fern. It was also the least healthy of the 10 new ferns I got. It has done well since though. The fronds of this fern are arched to extreme. They are no more than an inch or two above the ground. It is native to Korea, China and Japan.
Dryopteris Lepidopoda This is a new addition for the fall of '99. This ferns is native to Asia. It is Dead.
Cyrtomium fortunei rochfordianum This is a new addition for the fall of '99. It seems awfully similar to my other variety of Cyrtomium without any signs of variation. It survived it's first winter, but was very late to produce any fronds. It will be interesting to see if it survives a colder winter. It was still struggling as of 2001. It is barely alive as of 2003. It has only a couple tiny fronds. Died winter '03.
Dryopteris odontoloma This is a new addition for the fall of '99. It is apparently Himalayan fern, but I would not be able to distinguish it from some of the local wood ferns. This picture is from Spring 2004.
Athyrium filix-femina 'victoriae tall selection' This fern was new for the fall of 2002. It has done well in 2003 and this picture is from the Spring of 2004. It got quite large in '04.
Athyrium angustum 'Lady in Red' This fern was new for fall 2002. It has done well in 2003 as the picture shows. I don't think it has quite the vibrant burgandy colors it was supposed to, but it is a nice form.
Polystichum neolobatum This fern was new for the fall of 2002. The picture is from fall 2003. It appears it may be marginally hardy here, but it managed to recover nicely in it's first full season.
Dryopteris indusiata Judith from Fancy Fronds sent me this fern with my Spring 2004 order and asked me to "try it".
Adiantum aleuticum 'imbricatum' New for Spring '04. Died Winter of 2004-2005.
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